Learning from the New Kid on the Block: Four Steps to Creating a Coworking-Style Community in a Traditional Office Space

Among the many benefits attributed to coworking is the sense of community it provides freelancers and remote workers—a benefit that appears quite real. According to a recent survey of coworking professionals, an overwhelming majority of them—almost 9 of 10—stated that they are happier and less lonely than they were prior to coworking.

Done right, a coworking space can provide the kind of personal interaction that workers miss out on when working from home, or their local coffee shop.

Or increasingly, when working a traditional desk job.

Remote workers aren’t the only ones experiencing loneliness and isolation. Many traditional employees also find their workplace lacks a real sense of community—and in some cases, that community is decreasing all the time. With the number of remote workers on the rise, those still making the daily commute have fewer colleagues actually within the workplace to turn to for active collaboration and socializing. Talking with their coworking friends, traditional workers are increasingly aware that they are missing out on something.

It doesn’t have to be that way. While property managers may not be able to (nor wish to) recreate the coworking setup exactly, there are elements they can take from these spaces to make the traditional office more hospitable and welcoming for those working there.

  • Create spaces for collaboration. Whether these are dedicated team meeting spaces, open work spaces, or even a lounge or café where employees can go to chat with colleagues, providing workers with an area to bounce ideas off others can help grow a sense of community. Experiment to see what type of set-up works best for your particular employees and adjust accordingly.
  • Hold regular—but optional—events outside of work where employees can interact, learn from each other, and build friendships and relationships.
  • Use technology to maintain connections. Through technology such as video conferencing, employees can continue to collaborate with even those colleagues who are working remotely.

In the spirit of “if you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em”: if you don’t have the capacity within your existing building to offer the above options on-site, consider making coworking part of your business strategy. Use the alternative workspace as a bonus place for your workers to meet and work. Providing access to a coworking space can also help to attract top talent to whom this type of flexible work place has become the norm.

Written by: Kim Pierson

for CoeoSpace

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *